1.
Jason Zweig tells the story of randomistas, who use randomized, controlled trials to pinpoint what helps people become self-sufficient around the globe. The Anti-Poverty Experiment describes several successful, data-driven programs, ranging from financial counseling to grants of livestock.

2.
Can an early childhood program prevent child abuse and neglect? Yes, says the Nurse-Family Partnership, which introduces vulnerable first-time parents to maternal and child-health nurses. NFP (@NFP_nursefamily) refines its methodology with randomized, controlled trial evidence satisfying the Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy’s “Top Tier”, and producing a positive return on investment.

3.
Do recommendations from decision support technology improve the appropriateness of a physician's imaging orders? Not necessarily. JAMA provides evidence of the limitations of algorithmic medicine. An observational study shows it's difficult to attribute improvements to clinical decision support.

4.
Is the "data-driven decision" a fallacy? Yes, says Stefan Conrady, arguing that the good alliteration is a bad motto. He explains on the BayesiaLab blog that the concept doesn't adequately encompass casual models, necessary for anticipating "the consequences of actions we have not yet taken". Good point.

5.
A BMJ analysis says the knowledge system underpinning healthcare is not fit for purpose and must change. Ian Roberts says poor-quality, published studies are damaging systematic reviews, and that the Cochrane system needs improvement. Richard Lehman and others will soon respond on BMJ.

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