1. Criminal patterns → Risk assessment → Science of sentencing The Marshall Project describes the new science of sentencing, where courts use statistically derived risk assessments to inform their decisions about which prisoners should be released on parole, and how bail should be set. (Thanks to Gregory Piatetsky, @kdnuggets.)

2. Clinical & cost effectiveness → Evidence base → Pharma formulary Express Scripts, a large U.S. pharmacy benefits manager, has released its 2016 formulary outlining which drugs will be covered, and which will not. @BioPharmaDive explains the decision process: An independent group of physicians reviews the evidence on clinical and cost effectiveness of each candidate. "Me-too" products aren't making the cut.

3. March birthday → Atrial fibrillation → Real astrology? The Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association has findings from a retrospective population study that systematically explored (with a phenome-wide method) the connection between birth month and disease risk for 1,688 conditions. Authors claim that for 55 diseases, "seasonally dependent early developmental mechanisms may play a role in increasing lifetime risk."

4. Data-driven → Fewer middle managers → Nimble decision processes Data-driven management processes need careful driving, says Ed Burns. Benefits include transparent and objective decisions, and more nimble ones when analytics can eliminate middle managers. However, some efforts have backfired. More in this podcast by @EdBurnsTT, What are your tips for putting in place data-driven management strategies?

5. Aggregated economic data → Positive trends → Data-driven optimism Economist Max Roser is an optimist. Jeff Rothfeder writes in @stratandbiz about Roser's analysis of disparate data covering "everything from African development to violent death rates", and his conclusions that evidence unambiguously shows a world evolving for the better.

Leave a comment

Scroll Up